The New Regular Contributor for the Huffington Post

September 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Featured Articles, Front Page

the-new-contributor

 

There are only a few blogs that have the type of prestige that the Huffington Post offers. Now that I am a regular contributor, I plan to give people materials that will make them thoughtful, hopeful and motivated to reach their goals.

Being a blogger for the “Huff-Post” has been a long time goal of mine. When I say a long time, I mean that for the last few years, it has been a goal of mine. I had another goal reached this year that took four years to achieve. It’s been a long time since I did something that took me years to accomplish. And, it’s close to my birthday, I feel like celebrations are in order.

The main this is, I have another platform in which to serve my tribe and keep them informed, engaged and motivated. The wait is worth it!

I’ll let you know as soon as a post the first article or video, and
if you are on the email list, you will always get a heads-up!

Crowdfunding: 100 Days 100 Books Giveaway

ConstanceGofundme

The 100 Days 100 Books giveaway is a  summer campaign. In the United State Nearly half of the US adults who are in the lowest level on the literacy scale are living in poverty (between 41% and 44%). In addition to poverty so many other challenges in life can be directly correlated to literacy.

In an effort to contribute to the solution we are launching the 100 Days 100 Books Summer Reading Campaign and giving away a free book to a child in need for every book that is purchased at Ladoneya.com   The  workshops, Book Readings and Events are geared towards exciting the imagination and inspiring children to dream and create through reading and writing. Constance Dixon is the author and creator of this project

Support the project here

     https://www.gofundme.com/100days100books

Media Rookies: At Least Five Ways to Kill Your Interview

December 22, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured Articles, Front Page

Barefoot Mailman Interview Q&A w/Hayley Crowell (full text)

Media Rookies: At Least Five Ways to Kill Your Interview

It took 25 pounds of effort pushed into a 7-pound bag, but your big time media interview is happening tomorrow. You are such a captivating speaker that your electric charm and sparkle even resurrects the bleakest “dining-dead” special event banquet. So, there’s no need to worry about this game-changing exposure to thousands of potential clients. On the other hand, maybe it might be time to review your media training. Remember there are five things that will easily kill your interview.
1) Being late. The professionalism you intend to deliver to the client begins with the interviewer. Don’t forget, the host can flatten your interview if they are irritated by your punctuality and courtesy. Media hosts plan every second of their show, every minute matters.
2) ”Let me make a long story short!” You are not the editor! Make a short story shorter! The primary purpose of the interview should be describable with zero distractions from your intended point of impact. Concrete phrases like “$15 an hour” instead of “a livable wage increase,” delivers a concept with maximum impact plus it’s easy to remember.
3) Forgetting to tune, term and tone your presentation for your intended audience, not the host or interviewer. If you’re marketing to individuals already familiar with the industry, the tune may be more like “shop talk” sprinkled with familiar business terms. Also, the tone may be simple “light opinion” instead of a “winning advice” lecture.
4) Rejecting media coaching and training, and relying on your extensive credibility as a public speaker instead. Attempting to deliver on-the-spot media interviews often leads to public relations disasters. Delivering “fluster-free,” conversational media interviews requires training, practice, and preparation. Through training, you create the habit of establishing in advance the purpose of your story, the reason for the interview and the reporter’s expectations. This discipline increases your chance of appearing very relaxed and confident during your interview.
5) Repeating negative phrases or words used in a question by the reporter. Even if you disagree with the negative description, repeating it encourages the reporter to included it as a highlight of the interview. Making every effort to respond using positive terms keeps you in control of the narrative regarding your topic.
Paying attention to these suggestions, filling your responses with humor whenever appropriate and showing a pleasantly energetic attitude creates the best outcomes. Each interview can be a public relations nightmare or a positive upside opportunity.

 

The Wright Place TV Show 2016 Season Starts soon!

To be a guest on the show visit : http://members.showtimemediaacademy.com/wptv/

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