Media Rookies: At Least Five Ways to Kill Your Interview

December 22, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured Articles, Front Page

Barefoot Mailman Interview Q&A w/Hayley Crowell (full text)

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Media Rookies: At Least Five Ways to Kill Your Interview

It took 25 pounds of effort pushed into a 7-pound bag, but your big time media interview is happening tomorrow. You are such a captivating speaker that your electric charm and sparkle even resurrects the bleakest “dining-dead” special event banquet. So, there’s no need to worry about this game-changing exposure to thousands of potential clients. On the other hand, maybe it might be time to review your media training. Remember there are five things that will easily kill your interview.
1) Being late. The professionalism you intend to deliver to the client begins with the interviewer. Don’t forget, the host can flatten your interview if they are irritated by your punctuality and courtesy. Media hosts plan every second of their show, every minute matters.
2) ”Let me make a long story short!” You are not the editor! Make a short story shorter! The primary purpose of the interview should be describable with zero distractions from your intended point of impact. Concrete phrases like “$15 an hour” instead of “a livable wage increase,” delivers a concept with maximum impact plus it’s easy to remember.
3) Forgetting to tune, term and tone your presentation for your intended audience, not the host or interviewer. If you’re marketing to individuals already familiar with the industry, the tune may be more like “shop talk” sprinkled with familiar business terms. Also, the tone may be simple “light opinion” instead of a “winning advice” lecture.
4) Rejecting media coaching and training, and relying on your extensive credibility as a public speaker instead. Attempting to deliver on-the-spot media interviews often leads to public relations disasters. Delivering “fluster-free,” conversational media interviews requires training, practice, and preparation. Through training, you create the habit of establishing in advance the purpose of your story, the reason for the interview and the reporter’s expectations. This discipline increases your chance of appearing very relaxed and confident during your interview.
5) Repeating negative phrases or words used in a question by the reporter. Even if you disagree with the negative description, repeating it encourages the reporter to included it as a highlight of the interview. Making every effort to respond using positive terms keeps you in control of the narrative regarding your topic.
Paying attention to these suggestions, filling your responses with humor whenever appropriate and showing a pleasantly energetic attitude creates the best outcomes. Each interview can be a public relations nightmare or a positive upside opportunity.

 

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How to Free Yourself to Grow Big with Photography Booking Software

Photography and The Law

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Congratulations, you’re a freelance photographer and you’re looking to book some new clients! This is an exciting time in your life and the sheer exhilaration of being your own boss is a wonderful feeling you should hold on to. But first things first, it’s time to make a plan and get your business organized, and strategically positioned for success. Here are a few of the most trusted tips from pro photographers who have experience in the freelance world.

First up: get some kind of photography booking software. For example, BookedIn.com has a very popular version photographers use.The important thing in choosing this software is to ensure it is easy to use. This will be taking care of a lot of the annoying tasks for you in running the business, so don’t be afraid to spend a little bit of money up front to get your bookings in order. This type of software also takes care of a lot of the communication info for your clients, so you won’t need to be emailing people back and forth all day. instead you can just go out there or be in the studio shooting photos all day. No need to have someone answering your phone for you or hire an assistant.

Next up prepare a list of things you must ensure you have in order. Equipment insurance, photography editing software licences, a template for your client booking contracts and agreements, business cards to give out, and finally a portfolio website that can be easily updated. Once you have all of these things sorted out, the next thing on the list is to promote your business and get some clients! To keep the money flowing in, promoting yourself and becoming a good salesperson is key. If you don’t have any clients at all, start by putting out the word to family and friends. Word of mouth advertising can be some of the most powerful in the business.

How I Got 2.3 Million Downloads

December 17, 2015 by  
Filed under Featured Articles, Front Page

How I Got 2.3 Million Downloads

Gift

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This is a new ebook about how to make your app go viral

It’s also got good strategies for anyone who wants anything to go viral

The ebook is written by Stewart Hall

Stuart has been involved in mobile since the early days of the App Store as a developer, blogger and entrepreneur. He is currently co-founder and Chief Bot at Appbot. In a single night he built the 7 Minute Workout app, the,  blogged the story of growing the app to 2.3 million downloads before exiting to a large fitness device company. Previously he was co-founder of Filter Squad who built the Discovr series of applications which achieved over 4 million downloads.

Get the free download here

https://appbot.co/books/how_i_got_2_million_downloads?s=1

 

 

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