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August 27, 2022 by  
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Kitty Fund Awards $1.25 Million To Moms Who Start Businesses

Kim Folsom’s mother, Catherine “Kitty” Abrams Tadlock Webster, was an entrepreneurial powerhouse who built not one but two highly successful businesses. She later went on to help her daughters Kim and Meghan build three of their own companies: Five Mountains, a real estate development firm; MyFavoriteFlorist.com, which resulted in Meghan’s winning the Small Business Innovation of the Year Award in 2008; and Founder’s First, a business incubator that helped shape future entrepreneurs. Although Kitty passed away in March of 2020 from pancreatic cancer at the young age of 55, she lived a full life with her family and friends by her side. After her death, Kitty left behind a legacy and request to be granted small micro-investments to aspiring female entrepreneurs competing in small employer-based businesses. Thus, the Kitty Fund concept was born.

I am excited that I am a Semi-Finalist for the Kitty Fund GRANT!

I am very grateful!

The Kitty Fund is an award that makes micro-investments in female founders who run small businesses with 2 or more employees. In honor of Mother’s Day and Founder’s Checkbook founder Kim Folsom’s mother, Catherine “Kitty” Abrams Tadlock Webster, who passed away in March of 2020.

7 Signs of Resentment in Relationships

Resentment DefinitionResentment a feeling of indignant displeasure or persistent ill will at something regarded as a wrong, insult, or injury.

One harboring resentment may feel personally victimized and may be experiencing feelings of anger or shame. If the feelings of anger and shame are strong, it becomes difficult to talk about.

As one continues to foster these emotions and holding them in, eventually they reach their limit and start expressing these emotions in the form of anger, disgust, and disappointment.

A disrespectful comment made by a partner could enable a build up of resentment, as could lack of attention. Unresolved resentment can cause conflict between partners, if left unresolved it could eventually lead to separation.

7 signs of resentment in relationships:

1. Unresolved Arguments

You notice your partner continues to do things that bother you, despite you telling them. You start to complain to your partner and find faults in each other. One argument after the next and none of them are effectively spoken about. The same arguments continue to surface and you are left with many unresolved arguments. Eventually, this shifts the positive outlook on the relationship and over time, all you notice is the negative aspects of the relationship. Instead of focusing on the problem, you are focusing on your partner’s flaws. In your mind, your partner becomes the problem and the relationship becomes daunting.

2. Lack of Attention

Lack of attention in a relationship can be apparent in different ways. If you feel like you are not being listened to, you may feel like your partner does not attend to you and you begin to build resentment toward them. If you feel like your partner no longer makes time for you, you may feel uncared for leading to feelings of resentment. Maybe you notice your partner is spending too much time on their phone or they are always late. This could elicit feelings of insecurities and distrust providing fuel for resentment.

3. Overthinking the Bad Experiences

You catch yourself persistently thinking about something that happened or something that was said which shaped strong emotions toward your partner. You feel emotionally stuck and unable to stop thinking about it.

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