Just Stop It!

There are a few things all business owners need to stop doing.

  • Stop thinking you can spend NO money on advertising your business and make a LOT of money
  • Stop spending more than 2 hours a week on social media pretending you are making money
  • Stop spending on things that do not increase the business income
  • Stop working all weekend without a break
  • Stop stalking prospects that will never become customers
  • Stop going after people who will NEVER spend ANY money with you
  • Stop hiring poorly
  • Stop joining groups that do not promote your business or help you grow.
  • Telling people you make 7 figures when the links on your website don’t even work

Just stop it!

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Aflac Sponsors College Football’s Heisman Trophy

Aflac Inc. (AFL), the world’s largest supplier of supplemental health insurance, has agreed to sponsor the Heisman Trophy, given to college football’s best player.

Aflac, which didn’t give details of the multiyear partnership, said its sponsorship will begin this season in the 77th year of the award.

“We know our accounts, agents and brokers are passionate about the game, so we are excited and honored to team up with this coveted award which recognizes the most outstanding college football player in the U.S. and represents the pursuit of excellence,” said Michael Zuna, senior vice president and chief marketing officer, in a statement.

The partnership allows the Columbus, Georgia-based company to offer exclusive, Heisman-themed experiences to its accounts and brokers, Aflac said.

 

Media Training From Seth Godin

FotografieLink / Pixabay

How to be interviewed

The explosion of media channels and public events means that more people are being interviewed about more topics than ever before. It might even happen to you… and soon.

  1. They call it giving an interview, not taking one, and for good reason. If you’re not eager to share your perspective, don’t bother showing up.
  2. Questions shouldn’t be taken literally. The purpose of the question is to give you a chance to talk about something you care about. The audience wants to hear what you have to say, and if the question isn’t right on point, answer a different one instead.
  3. In all but the most formal media settings, it’s totally appropriate to talk with the interviewer in advance, to give her some clues about what you’re interested in discussing. It makes you both look good.
  4. The interviewer is not your friend, and everything you say is on the record. If you don’t want it to be in print, don’t say it.
  5. If you get asked the same question from interview to interview, there’s probably a good reason. Saying, “I get asked that question all the time,” and then grimacing in pain is disrespectful to the interviewer and the audience. See rule 1.
  6. If your answers aren’t interesting, exciting or engaging, that’s your fault, not the interviewer’s. See rule 2.

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