5 Ways to Weed out Your Business Mind

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This blog post was inspired by a post on the Marc and Angel Hack Life Blog.

I love Hack Life blogs because you will find unusual shortcuts that are easy to learn. I find it hard to incorporate a short cut that takes 3 hours to learn and 60 days of practice to be of use to you. I recommend this blog as a regular read for Wright Place TV Viewers because you are busy, smart and always looking for a slight edge.

The Blog post is here http://www.marcandangel.com/2009/04/03/28-ways-to-slay-the-delay/

Weeding out your business mind means, getting rid of some of the projects you are working on. Frankly, they are keeping you from projects that could make you money or otherwise get your closer to your goals.

1. The organizing projects: Treat yourself to something nice. Have SOMEONE ELSE organize things for you so you can focus on making more money

2. Drop some events: Some of the things you are attending will not bring you closer to your customers, future customers or future business partners. They are just busy time to get you out of the office. Volunteering for a non- profit does not fall into this category. However, some of those ?networking? events you have committed to do.

3. Dump the newsletters: Seriously, if you have not read the ezine or printed newsletter, drop yourself from the list. Having a bunch of stuff you never got to or read is a drain on your mind power. At this point I never add a newsletter without dropping one I already get.

4. Limit the time: There are some things I work on and for some reason, never complete or get to work correctly. I work on them for a certain period of time and then I move on. Spending days on a non-essential item can really be a time and mind drain. I also like to time how long it takes me to do certain things so that when I delegate them, I know how long it should take someone else to do it for me. An excellent tool for this is the Action Machine

5. Admit it: Some of the things on your list are no longer a priority. At the time of this post, I am working on my biggest event of the year, the High Tea. This event happens in a few days and nothing else has priority. People who are requesting things have to wait until after the event. When priorities change, some things get dropped by the wayside. It?s fine, which is how it is supposed to be. You cannot keep adding things to your plate without taking others off. Everyone has limited time and not all opportunities can be taken advantage of 100 % of the time.

Give yourself a break!

What are you going to weed out?

When to throw out a business card

When To Throw Out A Business Card

It’s not just a matter of clutter. It’s not just a matter of contact management. Some of your contacts in your management files need to be thrown out also. It’s about productivity. It’s about making sure you are really moving your business forward and not just doing busy work.

Those contacts that you do not actively work are useless. It’s great when you have an autoresponder going out, and they get messages out to your contacts. However, some of your contacts, you have not written a note, an email, or made a call to in over a year. What do you do with that? If you want to re-establish contact, then do so with some information that benefits that person. If you can not find anything that really helps them, then forget it. I just recently got an email from someone I literally have not heard from in 2 years or more.


This person stopped returning phone calls or emails a LONG time ago. The email told me all about the charity she’ll be participating in and how much money I need to donate to help. In and of itself, this is great. I am happy she has found something to make her life meaningful. I am happy to donate to causes. At the same time, I am thinking, hmmm. This is the only thing you have to say to me? Give some money?

So, do yourself a favor. Make a real effort to connect or just drop it. You will run into that person some where and have the opportunity to start over. In the meantime, if you make they feel like you just want to use them, it’s not going to work. So look at your contacts. Send them something good for them ( not you) and drop the rest.

If you have gotten busy and do not regularly speak to your important contacts, change your schedule and start making time for that.


So, when was the last time you threw out a business card and why?

How Often Should You be in the Media

Updated: Seth Godin’s How Often Should You Publish?

bykst / Pixabay

Comments by Dr. Wright

How often should you publish?

How many movies should you star in next year?

How many records should you release? How many songs should you write?

How many times a week should you post to your blog?

And when should my next book come out? Or your next newsletter or that next cartoon? What about Nike–they launch more than one product every day. Is that too many?

Ask yourself , how often you should be in media? What is too much?

A lot of the stuff marketers make is unanticipated, impersonal, irrelevant junk that consumers merely tolerate.

But some of it is not spam, it’s content. Stuff worth reading, worth paying for (at the very least, worth paying attention to.)

So, how often?

This discussion is usually filled with superstitions, traditions and half-truths. Daily comics come out every day because that’s when newspapers always came out. And newspapers came out once a day because it was too expensive to publish three times a day (and advertisers and readers wouldn’t support the extra expense.)

When movies were met with great fanfare and often stayed in the theaters for months, it was suicide for a big movie star to do three or four movies a year. But in a DVD/YouTube world, there’s not a lot of evidence that this pace makes as much sense. Saturday Night Live was on every week because there’s only one Saturday a week, but if it had launched today, it’s hard to see the benefit of it being a weekly…

I’d like to propose that you think about it differently. There’s frontlist and backlist.

Frontlist means the new releases, the hits, the stuff that fanboys are looking for or paying attention to.

Frontlist is also the new interviews you have out.

Frontlist gets all the attention, all the glory and all the excitement. They write about frontlist in the paper and we talk about the frontlist at dinner. Digg is the frontlist. Siskel and Ebert is the frontlist.

Backlist is Catcher in the Rye or 1984. Backlist is the long tail (the idea) and now, the Long Tail (the book). In a digital world, backlist is where the rest of the attention ends up, and where all the real money is made.

Backlist doesn’t show up in the news, but Google is 95% backlist. So is Amazon.

The backlist in media is anything that gets on the web. Podcasts are online forever. So are blog interviews.

Sitting in a meeting yesterday, I brainstormed a term, “haystack marketing.” I googled it to see if someone else was using it. You guessed it–number one match was an article I wrote eight months ago. Google doesn’t forget even if you do.

When getting more media, it is best to have something you are known for. Start with one thing. Media=TV, radio, blogs, magazines, newspapers, and podcasts.

Take some to think about your specific backlist media and post them. You might inspire others!

Next Post will be about the Strategy that Seth Godin suggests!

 

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