Easy advertising for charity events

November 28, 2014 by  
Filed under A Note for You, Front Page

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Easy advertising for charity events

If you’re running a Christmas event, fund-raiser or charity event, finding ways to advertise are crucial. There are plenty of tried and tested methods and it can depend on the type of event as to how much advertising you’ll need to do. If it’s a one-off event there are some easy advertising tricks, while for groups and organisations who run regular events, there are some secrets to making the most of your advertising material.

The paparazzi

The local media will be important for promotion and can act as a free source of advertising for local events. Any good cause that benefits the local community will be of interest to local journalists and broadcasters. Even the smallest publication is likely to be hungry for content, so don’t think that you’ll be turned away! You can create a press release but it pays to make a call to the editor in question. Old fashioned phone calls tend to get attention better than emails, with which editors are often swamped; focus on the local angle and why the story needs telling.

Easy advertising options

Flyers and banners are two of the oldest known advertising tools. Despite the fact that most things seem to have gone online these days, local events (charity or otherwise) are still best advertised with real, solid advertising. Banner producers can be sourced nationally or locally and banners can be reused, if you avoid specific dates on the banner itself. The phrase, “see website for details” can be substituted, meaning you can reuse the banner for another similar event. You can use flyers to target busy places using volunteers – markets, malls and other shopping areas are good places to get maximum exposure in your community.

Talking of websites

Don’t forget the wonders of the world wide web. If your organisation has a website, set up a specific blog to advertise your event (or ask for volunteers), tweet about the event, add details to Facebook; it all helps to get the word out! You can even record a video and post it on YouTube.

Corporate sponsors

Offer advertising for local businesses at your event in return for sponsorship. Companies which are supporting you will be glad of the free advertising on your website (keep it off banners though if you want to reuse them!). As well as sponsorship, you can ask them to distribute flyers with their own promotional material in their offices or retail spaces.

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3 Things to Consider When Looking for Event Space

November 26, 2014 by  
Filed under A Note for You, Front Page

When it comes to performing on stage, or choosing the right place to perform, there are a lot of things you need to consider. As performers, it’s important to give out all your best in able to give the audience a great show. And there are some qualities, or let’s say contexts, that affects every performance. So it is crucial that you’re doing everything right. Especially when it comes to choosing the event venue. Okay, let’s say maybe you’re not a performer. Maybe you’re just looking for a place to host an event, say a wedding, a coming out party, or just about any social event that’s important to you. When it comes to these important events, the venue is also crucial to the success of the gathering. The performance space is where it all happens.

There are three very important details you need to consider when it comes to choosing the right performance space: The Location, where it is and how far it is from your guests. The Cost, how much will you be spending and if it’s right for your budget. The actual space itself must be taken into consideration. How many people or guests it can hold, does it have every facility you need, are everything accessible to all your guests, etc. The Borland Center for Performing Arts in Palm Beach Gardens, FL gives you all three. It is the perfect performing space for just about any event. It’s proud of the five outstanding spaces you can choose to use depending on which event you are celebrating. It can be a wedding ceremony, a birthday party, an anniversary, pre and post event parties… You name it; this place has the space to hold it! Everything from corporate events to just about any social gathering you can think of! Just dream and plan your party, and the Borland Center for Performing Arts can host the ceremony and reception of your dream event!

These five outstanding, unique and wonderful spaces are all blank slate, just waiting for your command to turn it into something magical, or whatever you’re planning! These spaces are like that pumpkin in that fairy tale just waiting to be turned into a beautiful coach, and you’re the magical fairy godmother or father, whichever’s the case. It doesn’t matter if you’re planning to invite 50 or 500 guests! Their facilities have the perfect option for all. The Borland Center boasts over 10,000 square feet of affordable space with stunning lighting effects. The five reception areas, The Theater, The Rotunda, The Ballroom, The Student Center and The Lake are ready to accommodate your next big event! Each reception has its own unique setting that will add more mood to your experience, and make everybody feel the vibe.

The History of British Television

November 24, 2014 by  
Filed under A Note for You, Front Page

Infographic: The History of British Television


No invention has impacted human life as much as the television. While the Japanese hold a reputation or being the most technically advanced country on the planet and certainly lead the way with regards to television innovations, it’s the British who deserve most of the credit. Long before smart phones, tablets and even home computers, British-born inventor John Logie Baird created the world’s first mechanical television in 1925. While he wasn’t the first to propose the idea, he was the first to create moving greyscale image – which had a scan rate of a mere 12.5 pictures per second. During subsequent years he significantly advanced the technology and even managed to transmit a long-distance signal from London to Edinburgh (438 miles) through a telephone line in 1927.

But early history aside, the real history of television began decades later in the 1950s when it started to become a feature of the everyday home. During this time there were an abundance of innovations regarding analogue and digital technology, which paved the way for trends that are still present in the industry today.

1950s and 1960s

One of the first British television broadcasts was the current affairs programme Panorama, which is still one of the BBC’s most prized possessions. The 50s and 60s also brought us Blue Peter and the Apollo 11 moon landings. One of the most innovative shows of the time was Coronation Street, which is often credited as the first mainstream soap opera. It started in 1960 and was originally scheduled for only 13 episodes; however, even today it remains to be one of the most popular shows in the UK.

1970s and 1980s

During the 70s and 80s Hollywood started making its way to television screens. Movies were no longer reserved for the cinema and British terrestrial channels started to create single drams and mini serials. During the latter half of the 70s the video recorder was invented, which at the time was one of the most noteworthy innovations in the industry. In the early 80s the largest ever broadcast was aired – the wedding of Princess Diana and Prince Charles.

1990s and 2000s

The late 90s had the biggest technical innovation in the industry since the video recorder; the broadcasting of digital widescreen. In just over a decade this would phase out the old analogue models for good. In the 00s two of the most iconic television sitcoms ever created were launched, The Office and The Inbetweeners, which would go on to be remade in countries all over the world. This solidified Britain’s position at the forefront of creative broadcasting.

2010s and Beyond

Major changes occurred in the 2010s to the way we watch television. With the creation of online viewing platforms such as Netflix and Love Film, the whole industry moved portable. Now smart phones, tablets and laptop computers can access all of the latest television shows and movies anywhere in the world. This major change also caused a shift in the creative process. Many new television shows and movies are now “download only”, which has helped independent production companies find distribution and exposed the world to even more material.

ADS Digital have compiled a detailed infographic covering the history of British television programming since the 1950s. From the timeline we can see just how much the British television industry has influenced the world.

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